MIC History

1969

In this year came the first initiative of the Platform of Yugoslav Musical Work for the foundation of a Music information centre.

Stemming from this operational character of the Platform in 1969 was an initiative for the foundation of a music information centre, the first of its kind in Yugoslavia, which became independent in 1971 and now successfully operates under the aegis of the Zagreb Concert Management, but still in collaboration with the Platform. This publication is another outcome of this same cooperative activity.

Vuljević, Ivo: Foreword. In: Krpan, Erika, ed.
20 Tribina muzičkog stvaralaštva Jugoslavije. 1963 – 1983.
Zagreb: Croatian Music Infromation Centre
– Platform of Yugoslav Musical Work, 1983, p. 6.

1971

It is particularly noteworthy that the Music Information Centre (MIC) was founded [1971], which was in its development to provide incalculably valuable services for the development of Croatian musical culture. The basic goal of the MIC was to promote the works of Croatian composers. The founder and first director was Branimir Sakač.

Kovačević, Krešimir: Društvo skladatelja Hrvatske, 1945 – 1985.
Zagreb:  Croatian Composers’ Society, 1985, p. 20

 

Also back in 1971 MIC mooted the issue of royalties for the use of orchestral and other performance materials. This activity, which falls within the domain of authors’ rights, is carried out in concert with ZAMP of Zagreb. This activity should in the future too be carried out in the same way, that is, together with ZAMP, Zagreb. To protect their rights to performance materials, author, publisher and owner of materials sign a joint contract with ZAMP and MIC. Practice has shown that a clause stipulating the ability of authors to confide their work to some other publishing firm according to the practice of this publishing firm needs adding to the existing clauses, in the future and reactively (sic!) to existing contracts. Perhaps it will be sufficient just to enlarge item 2 of the contract. The list of works protected by MIC and ZAMP can be inspected in MIC, as can charges made to date for performance materials in ZAMP.

Sakač, Branimir: Letter sent to Zagreb Concert Management (ZCM),
December 1972, on the eve of MIC being incorporated into the ZCM.

1972

On January 11, 1972, the Croatian Composers’ Society adopted a DECISION on the founding of the institution Zagreb Music Information Centre as independent and self-managing organisation of labour.

The interim director of the Music Information Centre writes an application for the Decision about the foundation of the institution Zagreb Music Information Centre on January 13, 1972, to be entered into the Register of the District Economic Court, with the following data:

    1. Name of institution: MUSIC INFORMATION CENTRE Zagreb
      2. Principal place of business in Zagreb, Trnjanska cesta b.b.
      3. The fundamental goals of the institution is:
      – to work on and affect the endorsement and promotion of Croatian musical art and also of the musical art of other peoples and ethnicities of the SFRY in our country and abroad
      – to publish for this purpose expert publications, disks and other documentation material
      – to organise or to execute certain services in the production of permanent or occasional musical events such as festivals and the like, in which a prominent place is taken by domestic musical art, and to engage domestic and foreign artists and artistic ensembles for these events and inter-festival activities
      – together with ZAMP Zagreb to organise and to take care of the rights of musical artists as holders of authors’ rights to performance musical materials that are used for the purpose of performing their works
      – for the sake of all other matters related to the achievement of the goal of the basic activity of the Zagreb Music Information Centre.
      4. The interim director is Branimir Sakač.
      5. The founder of the institution is the Croatian Composers’ Society

 

RULING OF THE DISTRICT ECONOMIC COURT IN ZAGREB

 

On January 18, 1971, a letter went from Branimir Sakač to the City Fund for the Advancement of Cultural Activities, Zagreb. In the appendix to the letter he explains the work of the Music Information Centre. Among other things he points out the establishment of useful connections

with many similar music information centres, publishing firms, artistic performance institutions in the world. During last year, extensive consultations were held with André Jurres, president of the International Association of Music Information Centres in the world, and at last year’s Platform of Yugoslav Musical Work, which he attended at the invitation of the Music Information Centre, the modalities of further collaboration between MIC and the International Association with other music information centres in the world were agreed upon.

This started the many-years-long international collaboration with and membership in the association that today is known as the IAMIC – International Association of Music Information Centres.


Narodne novine, or Official Gazette, announced the founding of the institution Music Information Centre on March 13, 1972, Official Gazette no, 10, XXV.

povijesni prilog 5

 

Pursuant to Article 92 of the Constitution of the SFRY, Article 117 of the Constitution of the SR of Croatia, Article 40 of the Basic Law on Institutions (Official Gazette of SFRY no 5/65, 50/68 and 55/69, Article 14 on the Law of Theatres and Other Stage Arts Institutions (Official Gazette no. 31/65, the Labour Community of the Music Information Centre in Zagreb, in session on March 20, 1972, adopted the Articles of Incorporation of the Music Information Centre, Zagreb.

 

At a session of the labour community of the Music Information Centre, composed of “Merkez, Marija-Željka, president, Nenad Turkalj, associate, and Branimir Sakač, interim director”, held on September 15, 1972, the issue of the further outlook for the work and development of MIC was considered and it was concluded that

the work of MIC would from technical and a financial point of view unfold much better if it were integrated with another similar and existing labour organization, such as for example the Zagreb Concert Management, the Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall or with some artistic association, i.e., with the Croatian Composers’ Society. At this time the labour community holds that the most suitable integration is with the Zagreb Concert Management, which represents the interests of reproductive music artists in a similar way as the Music Information Centre represents the interest of music creatives…. Conclusion: Integration between the Zagreb Concert Management and the Music Information Centre, Zagreb, will be proposed to the labour organisation Zagreb Concert Management, and the consent of the Croatian Composers’ Society, the founder of the Zagreb Music Information Centre, will be sought for this integration.

povijesni prilog 7

 

Letter to the Labour organisation Zagreb Concert Management of October 27, Branimir Sakač, asking for the consideration of the idea of the integration of MIC, points out the need:

within the framework of the implemented integration, for MIC to retain all its activity in achieving its goals, defined by the previous Articles of Incorporation of MIC, and to contain its own name, headed notepaper and the like. From a financial point of view the MIC activity, material and personal expenses will be covered by grants from the City and Republic fund(s) for the advancement of cultural activities, from the Croatian Composers’ Society, by income from its own operations and from other sources.

(MIC, archival documentation, October 27, 1972.)

The managing board of the Zagreb Concert Management a meeting on December 7, 1972, adopts a Conclusion on announcing a Referendum on annexing the labour organisation of the Music Information Centre Zagreb to the labour organisation Zagreb Concert Management. The referendum to be held during office hours on December 12, 1972. The referendum implementation commission is appointed and is composed of Slavko Kranjčec, Maja Burić and Vladimir Šavorić.

On November 3, 1972, the managing committee of Zagreb Concert Agency at a session held on December 25, 1972 considered the letter of September 18 and agreed with the proposed integration of the Music Information Centre and the Zagreb Concert Management.

povijesni prilog 8

 

A letter of Branimir Sakač, interim director of MIC (no. KDZ 8703/December 28, 1972) to the Zagreb Concert Management, occasioned by the imminent annexation of the Music Information Centre with information about the previous work and planned operations of MIC in 1972 and 1973.

1973

As we went on, we arrived at new ideas and the needs for them to be implemented, and so we started developing other production functions in the domain of music. We took it over from the composer Branko Sakač, who had founded the Music Information Centre, but did not provide the material premises for its work, and at that moment it was on its death bed. What MIC represents today in our music culture, someone else may say. I shall only recall that in the first two years of MIC as part of ZCM it issued the first in history two series of LPs of Croatian composers and Croatian reproductive artists. The never sufficiently mourned music information monthly OD-DO is also the work of our hands.

Poljanec, Miroslav: Sjećanja.
In: Koncertna direkcija Zagreb. 50 godina,
ed. Jagoda Martinčević, Zagreb 2002, p. 33.

From January 1, 1973, for the greater economy and efficiency of operations, the MIC operated as an independent sector of ZCM.

Now started an ample record release activity and a long-term collaboration with the recording company Jugoton

1974

Marko Ruždak, composer, and previous editor of the publications of Zagreb Concert Management (1969-1973) was appointed manager of the Music Information Centre. He remained in post until 1976.

The special emphasis of MIC work was on testing the possibility of marketing the works of domestic authors in the country and outside, collecting information about works and authors, scores and performance materials, addresses and conditions for leasing, possible performers, existing tape recordings and similar. MIC, apart from gathering all the necessary documentation, keeps professional records and a card index system. Together with ZAMP (Institute for the protection of authors’ music rights) in Zagreb, MIC organises a special service for leasing musical scores and performance sheet music for works of domestic authors and is working vigorously on testing out the market in other countries and finding business partners in these countries that as subsidiary publishers (Subverlag) can represent the interests of individual works of composers with whom MIC has contracts (according to the archival documentation of MIC, undated, probably 1973/74, a document in which the work of MIC is explained and information about the protection of performance materials of musical works in the MIC is given.

1975

The beginning of cooperation with Jugoton on the publication of the first series of LPs entitled Contemporary Croatian Composer, but also other thematic discographic releases.

1976

The Vatroslav Lisinski Prize of the Croatian Composers’ Society went to the Music Information Centre for continued work on the promotion of Croatian music.

Erika Krpan was appointed manager of MIC and remained in post until she was appointed manager of the Zagreb Concert Management in 1994.

MIC put a strong emphasis on the promotion of Croatian music through its publishing activity (recordings and books about Croatian music and musicians in Croatian and in other languages – Croatian and English, Croatian and German). In this period the exhibitions activity of MIC was stepped up at home and abroad, accompanying occasional publications and catalogues. MIC became a strong link in the accomplishment of the events of the Croatian Composers’ Society, particularly the Music Biennial Zagreb. The Zagreb Concert Management, at first known as Croatian Concert Office, and later as Zagreb Concert Management, was responsible for the organisation of Festivals (from 1961 to 1991), while Erika Krpan was both manager of MIC and programme director of MBZ for the festival years 1975 and 1977.

1978

MIC stepped up its book publication arm, which bore fruit in a series of titles about Croatian music the authors (and editors) of which were numerous prominent Croatian musicologists and authors, the basic goal of this activity being to promote Croatian music both at home and abroad.

1979

Under the aegis of the Music Biennial Zagreb, in the Culture and Information Centre of Zagreb, MIC put on the exhibition Musical Art of Yugoslavia.

Ten Years of Croatian Music Days is the title of an exhibition that MIC put on in Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall.

The exhibition Life and Works of Josip Hatze was put on in the History Museum of Croatia by Vladimir Straža.

1980

The exhibition Life and Works of Josip Hatze was shown in the Museum of Archaeological Monuments in Split. After that came a string of presentations of the exhibition Musical Art of Yugoslavia, in Cologne, Stuttgart, Belgrade, Opatija, Prishtina and Sarajevo.

I have to hand it to the Music Information Centre, Jugoton and all who have recently massively recorded disks, and the artistic performers and composers. In today’s times, exclusively printed propaganda means next to nothing. I think that it is mostly though the people who run it that are the most to be credited with these disks. For the fact is t hat in other Yugoslav centres such disks are not printed in this kind of quantity or with this degree of systematisation.

Gračan, Giga i Jurica Muraj: Više sustavnosti i dogovora,
Od-do, (3) 1980, p. 5.

What are we doing and why?

For years now the crisis point of our musical culture has been the processing and promotion as well as protection of sheet music. If this is the point of origin from which a work of music can make its way in the world, then after it come printing the same score, recording, disk, book. All these major publishing actions are devised in a series of different forms of advertising materials, from the individual piece of information to periodicals, from continuous work on the processing of data for regular concert seasons to assistance to festivals, all of it from the period from the first beginnings of music notation in this country to talented contemporary composers.

In this huge space in which the greatest efforts have to be invested into the fundamental systematisation of the material, in this untilled ground, little by little the criteria are being created, as well as what are called the standards for those forms of information that are appropriate for the needs of our musical culture.

(ek) Osobna karta: Muzički informativni centar,
Od-do, (10) 1980, p. 7

1981

Exhibitions are an activity that continues to be dynamic. MIC exhibits in Cannes, presenting Croatian Musical Art on Disks, while the Musical Art of the Peoples and Ethnicities of Yugoslavia is the topic of exhibitions in Berlin, Struga and Skopje.

1982

Two exhibitions were put on in the Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall: Dora Pejačević – Life and Work and Ivan Zajc – Life and Work. Both exhibitions are accompanied by information catalogues about the composers.

In Belgrade, MIC presented Croatian Music in Printed Editions.

1983

The festival activity of the MIC became even more vigorous and was expressed in a number of ways; as well as providing help in the accomplishment of the promotional materials of festivals and events organised by the Zagreb Concert Agency, it did the whole of the technical organisation of the 12th Music Biennial Zagreb in 1983; and after that came Zagreb ‘83, a festival of light music.

Keeping up with our music life and reading OD-DO, you have probably noticed that the ZCM’s MIC is among other things the producer of promotional materials for several of our festivals, which in the accomplishment of their programmes are related either more or less to our firm. But you almost certainly don’t know that festivals have become a MIC activity in a new manner. The first assessment of its ability to produce a festival as a whole was the 12th Music Biennial Zagreb. After that came a new assignment The Light Music Festival, Zagreb ’83.

Od-do, (6) 1983, str. 7

1984

In Bucharest the exhibition Musical Art of the Peoples and Ethnicities of Yugoslavia and in Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall Franjo Ksaver Kuhač – Life and Work marking the 150th anniversary of his birth.

1985

The exhibition Ivo Malec – Composer in Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall.

1988

Krsto Odak / 1888-1965 – marking the centenary of his birth is the title of an exhibition put on in Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall.

1990

Now started some much more vigorous engagement with the publication of sheet music of Croatian composers. Great attention was paid to the works of Dora Pejačević, but also to those of other Croatian composers, historical and contemporary

1992

MIC put on two exhibitions: in the Museum-Gallery Centre, Klovićevi dvori, an exhibition entitled Croatian Museum from the Beginning to the Middle of the 20th Century, and in Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall the exhibition – Jakov Gotovac, commemorating the 10th anniversary of his death.

1994

Jagoda Martinčević was appointed MIC manager; she stayed in post until she departed to be adviser to the Minister of Culture of the Republic of Croatia in 1996.

1996

Ivan Živanović becomes the new manager of MIC, a position he retains until 2003. His leadership results in MIC forging powerfully ahead and accomplishing numerous projects in the field of computerisation, establishing the reputations of Croatian composers and publications, including:

– the construction of Quercus, the Central Information System of Croatian Musical Life

– the announcement of the first Internet site dedicated to Croatian music and musicians, www. mic.hr

MICnet – the musical reporting service (collecting information and distributing it electronically to users)

– the international Dora Pejačević Project in association with the Hochschule für Musik und darstellende Kunst of Vienna

– the Répertoire sheet music series

– music distribution

 

In this year came the launching of Hereditas musicae, a series of reprints of top works of the Croatian musical heritage, the objective of which is to reprint the original edition of a given composition for the needs of historically informed performances of early music. This is an idea that resulted in the 1996 edition of the collection Sacrae cantiones singulis, binis, ternis, quaternis, quinisque vocibus concinendae of Ivan Lukačić.

1997

The making of a database that acquires the name Quercus, Central Information System of Croatian Musical Life begins to be accomplished. It is the outcome of several years of endeavours for all data relevant to Croatian musical life to be stored in a single place. The data are correlated in such a way as to show events in real musical life truthfully. The authors of the data base are Ivan Živanović, Jelena Vuković and Maja Šojat-Bikić, programmer and programme designer.

1999

An exhibition is mounted in Klovićevi dvori enitled Musical Gleanings of the Hruškovec Collection.

Work is started on the international Dora Pejačević Project, a Hochschule für Musik u darstellende Kunst Vienna and Music Information Centre collaborative venture.

The objective of the project is very clear, to enhance the international reputation of the works of Dora Pejačević. We want to achieve this first of all by issuing and distributing her selected works on recordings and in sheet music publication, as well as musical events and similar programmes.

Komanov, Dodi: Vječna Dora.
Razgovor: Ivan Živanović, muzikolog,
Vijenac 159, April 6, 2000

 

The Internet site www.mic.hr comes to life; this is the first Croatian site aimed at promoting Croatian music. It contained a directory (a list of institutions, events and musicians), a catalogue (of Croatian music editions), a calendar (a review of events in Croatia, a music exchange (instruments, journals, sheet music), novelties from Croatian musical life and MIC Club (friends and links). All the contents were presented bilingually

2000

The Vatroslav Lisinski Prize of the Croatian Composers’ Society goes to the Music Information Centre for its contribution to Croatian musical art.

2001

The celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Zagreb Concert Agency and the 30th anniversary of the Music Information Centre. A special session was put on in the lobby of Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall, a grand concert and an exhibition for the occasion produced by the Music Information Centre.

This year saw the publication of the Catalogue of Croatian Musical Editions with details about editions of Croatian music published in the last fifty years, generated from Quercus, the Central Information System.

The purpose of this edition of the catalogue and of future editions is to make Croatian musical editions accessible to all who need them, On the other hand, another goal is to enable all our musicians to be equally involved in the organism that we call Croatian musical life and to create a still better climate for learning, performing and creating music.

Živanović, Ivan: Foreword,
Katalog hrvatskih glazbenih izdanja,
Croatian Music Information Centre, 2001.

At the annual general assembly of IAMIC, the International Association of Music Information Centres, held from September 13 to 18 in Norway, MIC editor Jelena Vuković was elected coordinator of the project IAMIC – Annual List of Works. This project, whose goal is to promote the music of the member states and to foster linkages, resulted in the publication of three annual catalogues, with one part each for a given ensemble created in a ten-year period. She led the project up to 2005

2002

In the framework of the 24th Days of Croatian Music of the Croatian Composers’ Society, the artistic director of which was Ivan Živanović, MIC, in association with the Student Centre, organised the First Croatian Music Fair (May 15 to May 18, 2002). The technical running of the event was confided to Jelena Vuković, editor at MIC. Twenty six exhibitors from Croatia exhibited in the lobby of the Student Centre Cinema in Zagreb (they were music organisations, societies, instrument builders, music schools, festivals, agencies, record companies, publishers, sheet music sellers, radio stations) and a number of accompanying events and presentations were held during the course of the fair.

Launching of the Répertoire series. This was imagined as a series of small-scale sheet music publications featuring successful compositions by Croatian composers, with visually attractive front covers and big print orders, aimed at being distributed world-wide. Ten sheet music editions were issued in his series, including the Dance for Violin of Miroslav Miletić, which the distinguished Serbian-French violinist Nemanja Radulović put on his solo CD Bach-Miletić-Paganini-Ysaÿe released by the label Transart Live in 2006. Thanks to this series too, Parać’s Quartet for Clarinet, Violin Cello and Piano was performed in the USA, while the collection Forse vien fuor l’Aurora by Franscesco Sponga Usper made its way onto the concert platform in Croatia, and is gradually breaking into the European market.

2003

The Internet Page www.mic.hr was awarded at “the most important Croatian Internet Compeition VIDI WEB TOP 100” and is placed in the list of the hundred best Croatian Websites for 2003, and in the list of the 10 best Croatian web sites in the State Organisations category.

2000 Nešto za uspomenu

2005

Davor Merkaš becomes the new manager of MIC, remaining in this position until 2017. In this period, as leader, alongside the existing publishing activity (records, books and notation) he focused attention powerfully on:

– the preservation of the Croatian musical heritage through the following projects:

Noah’s Ark – search for, protection of and timely archiving of autographs of Croatian composers of prime importance for the Croatian musical and cultural heritage

Hrčak (“hamster”) – locating manuscripts and autographs of scores of compositions of Croatian composers in private estates, owned by private persons, and their transfer to and archiving in music libraries that have the best conditions for their keeping.

Live composers – care for the oeuvres of living composers and their estates so that they are stored in the safest places for their preservation (music libraries, archives and so on)

– the digitisation of musical material

– the promotion of Croatian music abroad, particularly thorough the organisation of the Festival of Croatian Music in Vienna (2005-2018) and in Berlin (2008), in association with the Society for the Promotion of Croatian Music. Founder and artistic director of the Festival: Davor Merkaš.

– successfully achieved international collaboration with the German publishing firm cpo the goal of which is the release of recordings with the works of Croatian composers Dora Pejačević and Boris Papandopulo.

2008

In addition to the Festival of Croatian Music in Vienna, MIC organises the Festival of Croatian Music in Berlin.

2012

The beginning of the systematic collection of material and its digitisation: manuscripts of Croatian composers, with in time programme booklets and catalogues of the leading organisers of concert.

Croatian MIC from 2012 to 2015 took part in the fulfilment of the The Minstrel Project (MusIc Network Supporting Transnational exchange and dissemination of music Resources at European Level ) financed by the European Union (a programme of the European Commission for culture and education, Culture 2007-2013). Eleven member countries were involved in the project: Greece, Slovakia, Poland, Austria, Cyprus, Belgium, Slovenia, Czechia, Portugal, Croatia and Latvia).

2015

The years-long international project Minstrel was brought to a successful close. One of the outcomes of the project was the digital publication Brochure on Croatian Music

2017

By the decision of the City Assembly to annexe the Zagreb Concert Management to Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall of March 21, 2017, the Music Information Centre became a component part of Lisinski Hall:

The Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall shall take over all the documentation and materials of Zagreb Concert Agency about Croatian musical art and the musical heritage at home and abroad, with the pertaining information systems and databases and provide them with appropriate protection and housing depending on the kind of documentation and material, in other words, the continuation of the work of the Music Information Centre, now as a special organisational unit.

Izvor: http://www1.zagreb.hr/

By merging the Zagreb Concert Management with the Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall, the Music Information Center becomes part of its Multimedia and Documentation Department, headed by Ana Unkić. In addition to systematic work on the digitization of the works of Croatian composers, a new impetus in music publishing is beginning and in just two years (2017-2019) the catalog of MIC publications has been supplemented with fifty new (50) titles.

The series Tomaso Cecchini Opera omnia was launched. The aim is to publish the whole of the printed oeuvre of Tomaso Cecchini. Along with the main editors from Croatia, Professor Ennio Stipčević and the manager of the Music Information Centre, musicologist Ivan Živanović, the editorial team of the series includes distinguished musicologists specialising in the period of the musical Renaissance and Baroque and experts in musical palaeography from France, Italy and Slovenia: Vincent Besson, from the Centre for Advanced Renaissance Studies of the Francois Rabelais University in Tours; Professor Metoda Kokole, head of the Musicological Institute of the Research Centre of the Slovene Academy of Sciences and Arts, the distinguished music palaeologist Marina Toffeti, professor at the Università degli Studi di Padova from Padua and Marco Di Pasquale, professor at the Conservatorio di musica di Vicenza.

2018

This year saw the ending of the several-year-long project for publishing the first printed edition of the score and piano reduction of the opera Love and Malice of Vatroslav Lisinski, a choice work from the history of Croatian culture and music, on the eve of the second centenary of the composer’s birth. This was a major undertaking, achieved 172 years after the first performance of the work. Edition prepared by Mladen Tarbuk.

The 2018 Josip Andreis Prize of the Croatian Composers’ Society was awarded to the Music Information Centre of Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall for the edition of the score and piano reduction of the opera Love and Malice by Vatroslav Lisinski (Zagreb, CMIC, 2018)

2018 Nagrada Josip Andreis

2020

A year of surprises, the year of Covid 19. After the initial confusion and attempts to cope in the “new normal”, the Music Information Centre started a project for the construction of a new Internet site, www.mic.hr, and for the technical upgrading of Quercus, the Central Information System. The new Website has found a special place for the distribution of sheet music through the webshop, for the music of Dora Pejačević and Boris Papandopulo, for searching the database with the basic categories (musicians, ensembles, institutions, music editions, compositions of Croatian writers, concert life) and news from musical life. In the achievement of this project, the MIC team is joined by Wannabe j.d.o.o. and Cinnamon d.o.o. The appearance of the new Website marks the 50th anniversary of the work of MIC (1971-2021).

2021

This year has seen the publication of the newly constructed Internet site with contemporary and functional webshop that enables interaction between the MIC and professional musicians as well as music-lovers in the virtual world.

* * *

EMPLOYEES OF THE MUSIC INFORMATION CENTRE 1973 – 2021

Marija-Željka (Merkez) Potočnik (1973 – 2009)
Marko Ruždjak (voditelj 1974 – 1976)
Blanka Šavorić (1974 – 1987)
Erika Krpan (1976 – 2003)
Srećko Lipovčan (1979 – 1982, 1990 – 1993)
Marija Božić (1981 – 1988)
Franjo Marinković (1982 – 1993)
Ivan Živanović (1984 – 2020)
Raul Knežević (1985 – 2000)
Maja Oršić (1989 – 1996)
Jagoda Martinčević (1994 – 1996)
Sonja Radovanić (1996 – 2017)
Jelena Vuković (1998 – )
Borko Špoljarić (2000 – 2004)
Davor Merkaš (2005 – )

MANAGERS OF THE MUSIC INFORMATION CENTRE  1973 – 2021
Branimir Sakač (utemeljitelj i privremeni direktor 1972)
Marko Ruždjak (1974 – 1976)
Erika Krpan (1976 – 1994)
Jagoda Martinčević (1994 – 1996)
Ivan Živanović (1996 – 2004)
Davor Merkaš (2005 – 2017)
Ivan Živanović (2017 – 2020)

I have to hand it to the Music Information Centre, Jugoton and all who have recently massively recorded disks, and the artistic performers and composers. In today’s times, exclusively printed propaganda means next to nothing. I think that it is mostly though the people who run it that are the most to be credited with these disks. For the fact is t hat in other Yugoslav centres such disks are not printed in this kind of quantity or with this degree of systematisation.

Gračan, Giga and Jurica Muraj:
Više sustavnosti i dogovora,
Od-do
, (3) 1980, p. 5.

Whatever the case may be, it is an incontrovertible fact that Croatian music and its creators, composers, and then reproductive artists, musicologists and music writers deserve to be presented in an ongoing way to the local and foreign public in all the appropriate and usual ways.

For years now the crisis point of our musical culture has been the processing and promotion as well as protection of sheet music. If this is the point of origin from which a work of music can make its way in the world, then after it come printing the same score, recording, disk, book. All these major publishing actions are devised in a series of different forms of advertising materials, from the individual piece of information to periodicals, from continuous work on the processing of data for regular concert seasons to assistance to festivals, all of it from the period from the first beginnings of music notation in this country to talented contemporary composers

In this huge space in which the greatest efforts have to be invested into the fundamental systematisation of the material, in this untilled ground, little by little the criteria are being created, as well as what are called the standards for those forms of information that are appropriate for the needs of our musical culture.

(ek) Osobna karta:
Muzički informativni centar,
od-do, (10) 1980, p. 7

There is one big problem with music. This is an art that on the whole has a marvellous sound, one, however, that will very soon die down. If there is nobody to care for it, in some way or other, to look after it, share it,… then it will simply vanish.

Ivan Živanović, April 4. 2019,
presenting new titles in the CMIC catalogue

In its fifty-year long history, the Music Information Centre has put on numbers of exhibitions in Croatia and elsewhere with the goal of promoting Croatian musical art.

1979

Zagreb – Culture and Information Centre, MBZ
The Musical Art of Yugoslavia

 

Zagreb – Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall
Ten Years of Croatian Music Days

Zagreb – Croatian History Museum
The Life and Work of Josip Hatze
Exhibition set-up by Vladimir Straža

1980

Split – Museum of Archaeological Monuments
The Life and Work of Josip Hatze

Cologne – SFRY Culture and Information Centre Gallery
The Musical Art of Yugoslavia
Exhibition set-up Vladimir Straža

Stuttgart – Dom sindikata
Glazbeno stvaralaštvo Jugoslavije

Belgrade – Sava Centre
Marking the 20th General Assembly of UNESCO
The Musical Art of Yugoslavia

 

OpatijaKvarner Hotel
Yugoslav Musical Art Forum
The Musical Art of Yugoslavia

Prishtina – The Boro and Ramiz Youth Centre
The Musical Art of Yugoslavia

Sarajevo – Music Academy
The Musical Art of Yugoslavia

 

1981

Cannes – MIDEM
Croatian Musical Art on Disks

Berlin – State Library Gallery
The Musical Art of the Peoples and Ethnicities of Yugoslavia

 

 

Struga
The Musical Art of the Peoples and Ethnicities of Yugoslavia

Skopje
The Musical Art of the Peoples and Ethnicities of Yugoslavia

Zagreb – Croatian Music Institute
From the Posthumous Papers of Božidar Širola (CMI)
Exhibition created by Marcel Bačić

1982

Zagreb – Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall
Dora Pejačević – Life and Works
Exhibition created by Ladislav Šaban
Exhibition set-up by Marcel Bačić
Opening in the Lobby of the Lisinski Large Hall, February 19, 1982

Zagreb – Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall
Ivan Zajc – Life and Works
Exhibition created by Nada Premerl, Lovro Županović and Hubert Pettan
Expert associate Zdravko Blažeković
Exhibition set-up by Franjo Marinković and Josip Radović
Opening in the Lobby of the Lisinski Large Hall, December 11, 1982

Belgrade –27th International Book Fair
Croatian Music in Printed Editions

1984

Bucharest
The Musical Art of the Peoples and Ethnicities of Yugoslavia

Zagreb – Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall
Franjo Ksaver Kuhač – Life and Works to mark the 150th anniversary of his birth
Exhibition created by Dubravka Franković, Zdravko Blažeković and Ladislav Šaban
Opening in the lobby of the Lisinski Large Hall, November 20, 1984

1985

Zagreb – Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall
Ivo Malec – Composer
Exhibition created by Marija Božić
Exhibition set-up by Franjo Marinković
Opening in the lobby of the Lisinski Large Hall, October 31, 1985

1988

Zagreb – Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall
Krsto Odak / 1988-1965 – marking the centenary of his birth
 Opening in the lobby of the Lisinski Large Hall, April 23, 1988

1992

Zagreb – Museum-Gallery Centre – Klovićevi dvori
Croatian Music from the Beginning to the Middle of the 20th Century
Exhibition set up by Maja Oršić

Zagreb – Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall
Jakov Gotovac – Commemorating the 10th anniversary of his Death
Opening in the Lobby of the Lisinski Large Hall, May 30, 1992
Exhibition created by Jagoda Martinčević
Exhibition set up by Franjo Marinković

*After the exhibition there was the first performance of the opera/oratorio Petar Svačić by Jakov Gotovac, constituting part of the Zagreb Philharmonic Orchestra Days of Jakov Gotovac Festival and also marking the celebration of Croatian Statehood Day.

Samobor
Ferdo Livadić: Samobor Life and Work
Exhibition created by Nada Bezić and Ivan Sudnik

1999

Zagreb – Klovićevi dvori
Musical Gleanings of the Hruškovec Collection
Exhibition created by Tomislav Hruškovec

2002

Zagreb – Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall
50 Years of the Zagreb Concert Agency, 30 Years of the Music Information centre
Exhibition created by Ivan Živanović, April 22, 2020

*After the exhibition there was a gala concert with a selection of the works of Boris Papandopulo.

In the early years of the work of MIC its festival activity was in large part devoted to the production of programme and promotional materials. But in 1983, MIC was charged with the production of the 12th Music Biennial Zagreb, and the plan then was to have it produce other festival events.

An exceptionally important place in the festival activity is occupied by the complete programming and organisation of an international festival, the first of its kind, the Festival of Croatian Music in Vienna, from 2005 to 2018 (in Berlin too, in 2008).

THE FESTIVAL OF CROATIAN MUSIC IN VIENNA (2005-2018).

The festival of Croatian Music in Vienna (Festival der kroatischen Musik in Wien) is a project of the Zagreb Concert Agency’s Music Information Centre, the concept, programme and contents of which were devised and systematised by Davor Merkaš, the then manager of the Music Information Centre of the Zagreb Concert Management. The original idea of the festival was to present Croatian music, in all its kinds and genres, and interpreted by top musicians, Croatian and foreign, in the most prestigious concert venues of the city of Vienna, as well as to ensure the best possible media promotion and presence in Viennese and Austrian media for the project itself as well as for the participants. Within the framework of the Festival, starting from 2005, over a time span of a month, every year, from 10 to 15 concerts were held, the objective being to present Croatian music and musicians from various areas of music. Festival events took place in numerous celebrated Vienna concert venues: Musikverein, Konzerthaus, Palais Eschenbach, City Hall, Austrian National Library, ORF Grand Hall, Palais Lobkowitz, Porgy&Bess Jazz Club and other places as well as in well-known Viennese consecrated spaces such as the Peterskirche and Ruprechtskirche. In those thirteen years, the Festival presented the most important Croatian interpreters, composers, ensembles and orchestras, such as the Zagreb Philharmonic Orchestra, the Zagreb Soloists, LADO – Ensemble for Folk Song and Dances of Croatia, Croatian Chamber Orchestra, Zagreb Quartet, Croatian Baroque Ensemble; hornist Radovan Vlatković, pianist Martina Filjak; Vjekoslav Šutej; Ivan Repušić; jazz musicians Tamara Obrovac, Boško Petrović, Elvis Stanić, Matija Dedić, Arsen Dedićc, Massimo Savić and Oliver Dragojević; the a capella vocal groups Cambi and Sinj Kastav and many others. During the lifetime of the festival in Vienna, more than 700 interpreters appeared and over 100 works of Croatian composers were performed, some of them being actually first performed at this very Festival. In all years, the Festival of Croatian Music in Vienna was very well covered in the media. The concerts were featured in numerous Austrian dailies, by the state radio and television company, ORF, and the Stephansdom radio station (today Radio Klassik). For some years the Festival’s media patron was the high-circulation and well-regarded Austrian daily Die Presse. The origins of the Festival of Croatian Music in Vienna lie in the work of the Association for the Promotion of Croatian Music in Vienna (Verein zur Förderung der kroatischen Musik in Wien) founded by Davor Merkaš in 1999. In 2019 the production of the Festival was taken over by KIC, the Cultural Information Centre

2005

THE FESTIVAL OF CROATIAN MUSIC IN VIENNA

2006

THE FESTIVAL OF CROATIAN MUSIC IN VIENNA

2007

THE FESTIVAL OF CROATIAN MUSIC IN VIENNA

2008

THE FESTIVAL OF CROATIAN MUSIC IN VIENNA

2008

THE FESTIVAL OF CROATIAN MUSIC IN BERLIN

2009

THE FESTIVAL OF CROATIAN MUSIC IN VIENNA

2010

THE FESTIVAL OF CROATIAN MUSIC IN VIENNA

2011

THE FESTIVAL OF CROATIAN MUSIC IN VIENNA

2012

THE FESTIVAL OF CROATIAN MUSIC IN VIENNA

2013

THE FESTIVAL OF CROATIAN MUSIC IN VIENNA

2014

THE FESTIVAL OF CROATIAN MUSIC IN VIENNA

2015

THE FESTIVAL OF CROATIAN MUSIC IN VIENNA

2016

THE FESTIVAL OF CROATIAN MUSIC IN VIENNA

2017

THE FESTIVAL OF CROATIAN MUSIC IN VIENNA

2018

THE FESTIVAL OF CROATIAN MUSIC IN VIENNA

Eternal Dora

The international Dora Pejačević Project was begun in 1999; a joint Croatian and Austrian cultural project, its goal was to enhance the international reputation of the works of composer Dora Pejačević by publishing and distributing her works in sheet music editions and on sound recording media. The project was initiated by Universität für Musik und darstellende Kunst in Vienna and the Music Information Centre, other institutions connected with work on the works of Dora Pejačević or with international cultural collaboration also being included. Primarily, this means the Croatian Music Institute, the Austrian Cultural Institute and the history of Croatian music section of the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts. As well as engaging in promotional work and mediating in concerts given in Austria, Croatia, Brazil, Germany and Switzerland, to date the Music Information Centre has published almost the whole oeuvre of Dora Pejačević in the form of sheet music editions  and five disks of her works released by the German  label cpo. Thanks to the efforts of the MIC and its partners, the name of Dora Pejačević has become without doubt the most important of any Croatian composer worldwide, and her works the most performed.

Below is more detail about the project taken from the 2000 interview given to Vijenac by MIC manager, the musicologist Ivan Živanović. (Vječna Dora. Interview: Ivan Živanović, musicologist, Vijenac 159, April 6, 2000)

 * * *

Dodi Komanov talked for Vijenac with musicologist Ivan Živanović

Eternal Dora

The objective of the project is very straightforward – achieving an international reputation for the works of Dora Pejačević. We want to achieve this primarily by publishing and distributing selected works of hers on disks and in sheet music form, all of this accompanied by performances of the music and similar programmes.

The Croatian-Austrian project Dora Pejačević was launched in the last few days in Zagreb as well.  On Sunday, March 26, a concert called Dora’s Musical Garden was held in the Croatian Music Institute, with Austrian pianist Anika Vavić playing works of Dora Pejačević, Brahms and Schubert. On Monday, March 27, a press conference was held in the Red Room of the Esplanade Hotel, at which there were talks by Koraljka Kos, who has for years been systematically engaged with the oeuvre of Dora Pejačević; by Elena Ostleitner, lecturer in the Universität für Musik und darstellende Kunst in Vienna; Walter Maria Stojan on behalf of the Austrian Cultural Institute in Zagreb; Andreas Zadeyan, owner of the record company Re Nova Classics, and Ivan Živanović, head of the Zagreb Concert Agency’s Music Information Centre.

It was these nice and valuable events on the Zagreb and on the international scene that gave rise to an interview with Ivan Živanović, musicologist and manager of the ZCA Music Information Centre.

The Music Information Centre and the Universität für Musik und darstellende Kunst of Vienna are in charge of the Dora Pejačević project. Could you tell us something about the beginnings of this collaborative venture? Who or what directly initiated the launching of the project and how did its construction start to attain its outlines?

The project was officially started in September last year; it was initiated by Elena Ostleitner of Vienna’s  Universität für Musik und darstellende Kunst and me, on behalf of the Music Information Centre of the ZCA.  We are the founders of the project and are currently in charge of it, but many other partners and many other institutions and individuals whose work is related to the work of Dora Pejačević and international collaboration are also involved. This primarily refers to the Croatian Music Institute, the section for Croatian music of the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts, the record label Re Nova Classics of Vienna and the Austrian Cultural Institute.

Why Dora Pejačević and not, for example, Blagoje Bersa or someone else? What reasons weighed down the balance in the choice of composer? Perhaps there was some kind of positive fascination present, because this is a woman who made quite a name for herself in a typically male profession, and then there is her aristocratic origins. Finally, Zvonimir Berković made a feature film about her.

Unlike most other Croatian composers, Dora Pejačević has had the great good fortune to have found a marvellous researcher and champion in the person of the musicologist Koraljka Kos. Without this primary research work, which Dr Kos did in the last five and twenty years, publishing several excellent books, we would hardly know anything about Dora Pejačević, whose work during that time we have come to know in reality thanks to the interpretations of our great pianist Pavica Gvozdić.  Without all this, there would never have been anything about projects such as this. I hope that many other valuable Croatian composers will also find similarly persistent and sterling researchers and advocates.

What exactly does the project cover and what results are now visible?

The goal of the project is very straightforward – to achieve an international reputation for the works of Dora Pejačević. We want to accomplish this primarily by issuing and distributing a selection of her works on records and in sheet music, and then there are also music events and similar programmes.  A part of this is the recent  concert of the excellent young Viennese pianist Anika Vavić who performed a programme with works of Pejačević, Brahms and Schubert.  This same programme will be heard in Austria and other countries (like Cuba and Mexico). As you can see, it is not only works of Dora that are on the programme, but also  works of acknowledged masters, precisely for us to see how great her music is and how it measures up, to put it rather coarsely but succinctly, to the competition.  The Dora Pejačević project is a big and long-term one. I would say, the biggest ever undertaken for the purpose of endorsing Croatian serious music. None of us involved suffers from megalomania and we don’t think we are going to make the name of this music in the world overnight. It’s our view that we can achieve the objective much easier and faster with a large number of small and well coordinated campaigns than with a few brilliant and costly gala performances.  What has been done so far in the project are: a CD and sheet music for the Piano Concerto in G manor op., 33, published by Re Nova Classics of Vienna and our MIC, respectively. There are also several other events with Dora’s piano and chamber music in Austria, the promotion of a project in November last year in our embassy in Vienna and this concert and press conference in Zagreb.  This is just a beginning, and many other campaigns and editions are planned for the future.

How is the project going to involve and encompass its most far-reaching raison d’être, the real positioning and incorporation of the Croatian heritage in the cultural  patrimony of Europe, and of the world?

The goal of the project will be achieved as soon as Dora’s works are a usual and regular part of curricula and concerts of music worldwide. The reason for this is that the music is  fantastic.  You have to bear in mind that nobody in the world, except where some current fad is concerned, needs Croatian, or American, or women’s music, what everyone needs is good, beautiful and interesting music. Why else would the Austrian label Re Nova Classics put good money into making a completely new recording of Dora’s Piano Concerto with the Nuremberg Philharmonic Orchestra, pianist Sigrid Trummer and conductor Manfred Muessauer?  Try and work out how much such a production costs and your head will start spinning. Naturally, from our point of view, we are glad that this is the music of a Croatian composer and that something is happening that we might call the incorporation of Croatian heritage into world cultural events, but the objectives of the project are first and foremost business oriented.  Put simply, the promotion is the beginning of the project, involvement in the world’s music industry is the ending. What follows now apart from new releases and editions is lobbying worldwide to get as many radio broadcasts and live performances as possible in the time to come.

How satisfied is MIC with its collaboration with partners in Vienna and Zagreb, and what is your specific share of the job, and then of the cake?

Very different interests are smoothly interconnected in the Dora project. Our interest is primarily culturological, even if the business part is far from negligible, while the Austrian partners tend to stress the business a bit more.  The biggest part of our job relates to publishing the sheet music.  We work together extremely well, but it’s too early to talk of cake, because this is the phase in which investment is needed.  In any case, there are very precise and clear agreements about all the segments of the job, and I think that without proper accounting there can’t be any decent cooperation.

Who’s financing the project?

On the Croatian side, the Ministry of Culture and the Zagreb City Office for culture regularly support MIC programmes.  In Austria, there is a combination of investment by Re Nova Classics, sponsorship ( the insurance firm Wiener Staedtische and Leopold Stocker Verlag), and recently the organisation Kulturkontakt, which specialises in financing joint projects of countries of Western and Eastern and Central Europe, has joined in.  Then there is the Austrian Culture Institute, which financed the Anika Vavić concert.  On our side, special mentions must go to our sponsors, Croatia Airlines, Esplanade Hotel and Katunar Winery, who responded very readily to our call for backing for the project.

Although Croatian MIC was founded back in 1971, the business of the institution is known to a small and rather professional circle.  Tell us something about your basic mission, the nature and manner of your work.

The basic mission of every national music information centre, including ours, is to present the music of that country in the world. This is done in various ways, above all by the dissemination of appropriate news and information, and also by issuing and distributing musical editions and releases (books, sheet music, records). The problem is how to do this, while being equitable, and spending the little money you do have as smartly as possible.

Since I have been at the head of MIC since 1996, I shall stick to that period.  The work of the institution is aimed above all at music professionals, but I think that it is not well enough known even among them.  We everyday put in efforts to rectify this situation, and we are succeeding.  I want everyone in the country who works in music, in some way, as performers, musicologists, composers, educators and so on to understand that MIC is not there for its own benefit but for all of them The foundation of our work is the big information system we have called Quercus – Central Information System of Croatian Musical Life, which gathers and processes all the relevant data about our musical life. There are lots of data and may I apologise to all those whose data are not yet in the database, but that is because we work in very cramped, not to say wretched, conditions.  All the information in Quercus is publicly available and already some similar institutions are basing their projects on it.  I think that a lot of people in leading positions in our culture are not aware how important it is to be able to accumulate work and knowledge. Systems like Quercus let us do this. Some of the data have been published on the Internet at our website www.mic.hr, which makes them easily accessible to our public, and the international public.  For example, Mr Zadeyan set up most of the business meetings in Zagreb from Vienna, thanks to our website and some of our composers have been performed abroad.  A positive effect of this kind of information system is very clear for if you make highly sought data easily accessible, you save people a lot of time and energy, and they can employ them better for more creative jobs.  This part of the job is routine promotion, and the result is a richer, higher quality and internationally more penetrative musical life.  From that come special projects like the Dora Pejačević.

Is Croatia competitively equipped for the process of the production and distribution of musical materials?

What we are most often lacking is knowledge, the more so because of the low price of labour and failure to pay, lots of highly qualified people look to earn their living outside Croatia.  And while in production we can do something, in the area of the distribution of musical editions, the situation is a real catastrophe. In the last fifty and more years, there has been no distribution.  It seems incredible, but there is an explanation. The problem lies in editions in the domain of serious music by their very nature needing a slow and lengthy distribution, and in a small market like ours, this is too slow, and no commercial distributors are interested.  I thought long and hard about this and hope I have found a way out. In a week or two we are starting a programme of the promotional distribution of all Croatian music editions and I hope that there will soon be some positive results.

How much does MIC succeed in its campaigns and plans, and how much do you think it might and should?

Without any doubt I can say we could do much more if we had better conditions, to do with both premises and funding.  Apart from that MIC doesn’t exist formally as an institution, only as part of Zagreb Concert Agency, which, considering its importance, seems to me to be less and less appropriate.

What kind of contacts do you have with similar institutions in the world? Is there any idea of founding a Croatian music information centre outside Croatia? The Poles, for example, founded the Polish Music Reference Centre in the USA, and the emphasis of their work is on the promotion of contemporary music and performers.

Our contacts with foreign countries are very strong and getting wider. One of the tasks I especially set myself, after I took up the job of manager, was to develop international cooperation, because this seemed to me very important. The first step was to enrol our MIC in the world association of similar organisations – IAMIC  (International Association of Music Information Centres)and then along the same lines we made contact with many other institutions worldwide. This considerably reinforced awareness of the presence of Croatian music, but to really make the reputation of the best we have, we have to put in a lot more effort. I think there would be no point in founding a music centre abroad, because there is plenty to do from Croatia.  It’s just important to have good contacts in the world and healthy business combinations.

Can the importance and quality of a project like Dora Pejačević be replicated in other activities of yours?

I’m completely sure that the international Dora Pejačević project raises our reputation, and so our élan. And there are also some other international projects we are involved in.  For example, there is the European Music Database that includes us together with Austria, Slovakia, Germany, Iceland, Holland, Italy and France. We joined in with them because the official IAMIC delegation that visited us in April last year assessed our Quercus database as being the most successful in CEE.

And to finish, what are the very next steps in the Dora Pejačević project, with of course congratulations for everything done so far.

The next steps are new releases of the piano miniatures of Dora Pejačević on CD and in sheet music, and concerts, and after the Dubrovnik appearance of pianist Ida Gamulin and actress Alma Prica (who will read  letters and writings of Dora Pejačević) in the Rector’s Palace on August 8, 2000, we invite you to a midnight glass of champagne.

Source: Vijenac

159 – April 6, 2000. | Archive